Yixing

Yixing Zhu Duan Teapot

Yixing Zhu Duan Teapot
Yixing Zhu Duan TeapotYixing Zhu Duan TeapotYixing Zhu Duan TeapotYixing Zhu Duan TeapotYixing Zhu Duan Teapot
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  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • From the workshop of Lu Xu Feng Zhi
  • Made from Pin Zi Ni clay
  • Strainer-type: 7-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin andTung Ting; dark strip style oolong such as yan cha; and Pu-erh.
  • 2.25" tall (to top of lid)
  • 3 oz capacity

 

This teapot is loosely made in the shape of a segment of bamboo - hence the name Zhu Duan. The stylish appearanceof this teapot is enhanced by the color of this clay, which is a very rich medium old-leather-chair brown color.

But if you look very closely at the clay thru a magnifying glass you will see why the clay has such a rich color: a field of microscopic black flecks in the clay influences the color but are not apparent to the naked eye.

Yixing Teapot with Calligraphy

Yixing Teapot with Calligraphy
Yixing Teapot with CalligraphyYixing Teapot with CalligraphyYixing Teapot with CalligraphyYixing Teapot with Calligraphy
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  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing City, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Production date: 1998
  • Bottom mark: Guo Zhen
  • Handle mark: Wu Yin (1998)
  • Made from Aged Hong Ni clay
  • Strainer-type: single hole
  • Best for steeping dark strip style oolong such as yan cha and Pu-erh
  • 2.5 tall (to top of lid)
  • 3 oz capacity

     

  • New pot -never used

 

 

We do not know the name of this teapot form, but we are told the calligraphy written around the opening of the teapot reads: "Sha Hu Yan Nian, Dan Qing Shou Shi " or "Zisha teapot and painting would help you to prolong your life and live to a green old age." Such a nice adage to remind one of the benefits of drinking tea and appreciating art every day.

Yixing "Cracked" Teapot

Yixing "Cracked" Teapot
Yixing "Cracked" Teapot Yixing "Cracked" Teapot spoutYixing "Cracked" Teapot handleYixing "Cracked" Teapot top
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  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Made by artist Ling Yan Ping
  • Made from Zi Ni clay
  • Strainer-type: 10-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin and Tung Ting; dark strip style oolong such as yan cha; and Pu-erh
  • 3.25" tall (to top of lid)
  • 8.25 oz

This contemporary design teapot mimics the apperance of a 'crazed' or 'cracked' teapot by incorporating thin lines of yellow clay. There is a pun in this design - some of the clay that is pulled from the ground in the Yixing area is found in thin layers in large rock sections, so the rocks must be broken to remove the clay.

Slightly larger in capacity than many Yixing teapots, this modernist teapot is well-designed and well-made.

Please Note:

Yixing Yuan Qu Teapot

Yixing Yuan Qu Teapot
Yixing Yuan Qu TeapotYixing Yuan Qu TeapotYixing Yuan Qu TeapotYixing Yuan Qu TeapotYixing Yuan Qu Teapot
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  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing City, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Production date: 1998
  • Bottom mark: Gao Zhongiuan
  • Handle mark: Wu Yin
  • Made from aged Hong Ni clay
  • Strainer-type: one single hole
  • Best for steeping dark strip style oolong such as yan cha and Pu-erh
  • 2.75" tall (to top of lid)
  • 4.5 oz capacity
  • New pot - never used

This is a sweet little teapot that was made in the 1990's. It is an early work of the Jing Dian Tao Fang clay studio and is made from aged Hong Ni clay. The clay came from the warehouses of the old Yixing No.1 factory ( Jiangsu Yixing Purple Clay Art Factory ) and the teapot was medium-high fired in one of the old factory kilns.

Yixing Wei Fu Teapot

Yixing Wei Fu Teapot
Yixing Wei Fu TeapotYixing Wei Fu TeapotYixing Wei Fu TeapotYixing Wei Fu TeapotYixing Wei Fu Teapot
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  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing City, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Production date: 1997
  • Bottom mark: Bai Ya Ping Zhi
  • Handle mark: Ding Chou (1997)
  • Made from aged Hong Ni clay
  • Strainer-type: 10-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping dark strip style oolong such as yan cha and Pu-erh
  • 3.75" tall (to top of lid)
  • 7.5 oz capacity
  • New pot -never used

 

 

This is an early work of the Jing Dian Tao Fang clay studio and is made from aged Hong Ni clays in 1997. The clay came from the clay reserves stored in the warehouses of the old Yixing No.1 factory ( Jiangsu Yixing Purple Clay Art Factory ) and the teapot was medium-high fired in one of the old factory kilns.

Today, the old tea factory functions as home to a collection of pottery studios with artists of different craft levels working in the skeleton of the old state run tea factory building but with a new modern air of individual entrepreneurship and international commerce.

Yixing Shi Piao Teapot

Yixing Shi Piao Teapot
Yixing Shi Piao Teapot
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  • Produced in towns surrounding Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Made by artist Zhou Shun Fang
  • Made from Qing Hui Ni clay
  • Strainer type: 7-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin and Tung Ting; dark strip style oolong such as yan cha; and Pu-erh
  • 2.25" tall (to top of lid)
  • 5.5 oz capacity

This teapot has a simple, traditonal form which gives it confidence and elegance. The teapot features three little round feet on the bottom, which elevates the teapot just a little.

It has a very smooth finish, and is cool to the touch, like a riverstone. The clay is soft brown with a hint of grey, and the overall appearance is one of refined austerity. The handle on the lid is shaped like a little bridge that spans the steam escape hole.

Yixing Qui Duan Teapot

Yixing Qui Duan Teapot
Yixing Qui Duan TeapotYixing Qui Duan Teapot base signature
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  • Produced in towns surrounding Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Made by artist Yuan Mingzhi
  • Made from Hong Ma Zi Ni clay
  • Strainer type: 7-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin and Tung Ting; dark strip style oolong such as yan cha; and Pu-erh
  • 3.25" tall (to top of lid)
  • 8 oz capacity

Please Note:

This is a handmade item - slight variations in the painting, colors, tooling, patterning and kiln effects of Chinese and Japanese teawares are to be expected. We have carefully photographed this item as best as possible - please be aware that different device screens can render colors and subtle tones slightly differently.

Want to know more?

Yixing Jun Lun Teapot

Yixing Jun Lun Teapot
Yixing Jun Lun TeapotYixing Jun Lun Teapot base signature
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  • Produced in towns surrounding Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Made by artist Zhou Shun Fang
  • Made from Qing Hui Ni clay
  • Strainer type: 7-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin and Tung Ting; dark strip style oolong such as yan cha; and Pu-erh.
  • 3.25" tall (to top of lid)
  • 6 oz capacity

This teapot is very elegant and stylish.

It has a very smooth finish, and is cool to the touch, like a riverstone. The clay is soft brown with a hint of grey, and the overall appearance is that of refined austerity.

The simplicity of it's form is seductive, The linear, precise shape of the knob on the teapot lid is in stark contract to the perfection of the oval line of the teapot body.

Yixing Dao Ba Xi Shi Hu Teapot

Yixing Dao Ba Xi Shi Hu Teapot
Yixing Dao Ba Xi Shi Hu Teapot
$0.00
$0.00
  • Produced in the vicinity of Yixing city, Jiangsu Province, China
  • Made by artist Wang Ming Zhi Zhi
  • Made from Pin Zi Ni clay
  • Strainer type: 7-hole strainer
  • Best for steeping: green-style semiball-rolled oolongs such as Tieguanyin andTung Ting; dark strip style oolong such asyan cha; and Pu-erh.
  • 2.5" tall (to top of lid)
  • 2.75oz capacity

Please Note:

This is a handmade item - slight variations in the painting, colors, tooling, patterning and kiln effects of Chinese and Japanese teawares are to be expected. We have carefully photographed this item as best as possible - please be aware that different device screens can render colors and subtle tones slightly differently.

Want to know more?

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