Long Ding

Green Tea
Zhejiang Province, China

2014 Pre-Qing Ming

Sold out! More in Spring 2015
Long Ding green tea
Long Ding green teaLong Ding green tea
$0.00
SKU: TGR-CH-LD-14
Out of stock
Price: $0.00
  • Green Tea
  • Zhejiang Province, China
  • Pan-fired
  • 'Lark's-tongue' thin buds
  • Crisp stone or mineral taste
  • Fresh, vegetal aroma
  • Bright green-colored liquor edged with silver

Steeping Instructions:

Use 2 teaspoons (2-3 grams) per 6 oz of water
Steep 2-3 infusions at 2 minutes each.
Water temperature should be 170˚ - 180˚ F

Long Ding green tea
Long Ding green tea
Long Ding green tea

Long Ding is one of eastern China's most exquisite and distinctive teas. It is a specialty tea from western Zhejiang Province, and it should not be confused with Longjing ( Dragonwell ) from eastern Zhejiang Province.

Long Ding is everything that we think a Chinese green tea should be - precise in appearanc and outstanding in the cup. It is a very smooth, sword- shapd, bud that is refreshing, sweet and aromatic. It has a crisp, flinty taste that is reminiscent of stone or minerals.

Because of their size and shape, Long Ding buds will stand up straight in the water as they steep- this is best observed when steeping the tea in a glass cup or mug.

Our visit to the Long Ding tea factory on our first tea sourcing trip to China was such a memorable experience.This region has many bamboo forests and a lush forest environment that is perfect for nurturing tea bushes to produce fine green tea.

We last had Long Ding tea in 2012 and are thrilled to offer this tea once again o our tea enthusiast customers.

NOTE:  Pre-Qing Ming teas are the first teas plucked each new spring season. Depending on the location and altitude in each tea producing region, leaf plucking can begin as early as the middle  week of March and continue until April 5th.

Pre-Qing Ming teas command the highest prices because the demand for these teas outpaces the supply each year. This is especially true for the Famous Teas such as Long Ding and Longjing, and the fever for these teas hits in China as well as in the West.